Why I'm Hopeful

Eight months into this journey, there have been days when I simply want to pack it up, sell the RV and buy a home in the middle of nowhere… and talk to absolutely no one. Ever again. The End. But, thankfully those days are few and far between. If nothing else, our search for unity in the church has grown both our compassion for others, as well as our patience. But, even with that, I’d be lying if I didn’t confess that sometimes I question whether true unity is possible, under the current circumstances, in the American church.

Then I think about the people with whom I differ in political leanings and/or theological interpretation. I know it’s possible because I live it out with those individuals. But, I’ve never really thought about WHY it works (in those rare instances) until our stop in Arkansas.

Years ago, the Lord crossed my path with a woman who would forever change my life. She became a spiritual mother, then a surrogate mother, during a season of life when I desperately needed it. It’s a role she took on for many women in our growing church. Yet, when she and her family left Maine to return to Arkansas, she remained a very important person in my life. She’s always been the first person I call when we’re desperate for wise counsel, need something covered in prayer, or find ourselves questioning the Lord… and ourselves.

Our time with Lisa and her family was short. Less than 24 hours. But, it was so sweet. All of her three kids happened to be in town as well, including her youngest, who had just taken a job with Liberty University. We sat at the table over dinner, catching up on life. It’s crazy to think that Lisa’s oldest kids were in middle school when we first met them. Jamie and I only had Sydney and Brayden at the time. So much had changed, yet so much seemed the same.

I remember looking around the table and feeling like I was home. And I was.

After dinner, we took dessert out onto the front porch and began sharing with them what the Lord had been showing us over the past couple of months. We talked about politics. We talked about differing theological interpretations around homosexuality. We talked about social justice. And here’s the thing, while we are more aligned on some issues compared to others, we don’t see 100% eye-to-eye on any of them.

On politics… most definitely not.

But here’s what I love about Lisa. She’s acutely aware that her political leanings might be a relational road block in the current climate and for that reason, she isn’t vocal about how she votes, or for whom she votes. (She also doesn’t shy away from talking about those things if she’s directly asked, which is another reason why I love her!)

For me, talking about these things isn’t a road block, (though some might argue differently!) because it’s what I’m called to. A couple of months ago, Jamie and I sat in our car, at a RV park in Washington state, and told our pastor we thought the Lord might be calling us to something that might hinder our ability to make (or maintain) friends on either side of the political (and theological) spectrum: To speak out against the entwining of faith and government in our country. (And just for the record, Jamie was the one who shared the epiphany. He’s actually the one who gets ALL KINDS of riled up over it.) I’ve become the contemplative one, while he’s become impassioned. It’s almost like our personalities have been switched. For those who know us, let that sink in.

Here is the unavoidable truth: I love Lisa and I know that no matter what, she and her family will ALWAYS be there for us. And the same can be said about us for their family. I will also admit that this might be one of the exceptions to the rule. (Jamie is having a really hard time talking politics and policy with his family right now… like so many other people we know.) It’s a tightrope we walk sometimes and, admittedly, it’s A LOT easier talking to strangers about these things than friends and family. Recently someone asked why I felt this way and the word that immediately popped into my head was UNITY.

Disagreements, by design, disrupt unity. And right now, some of the most divisive disagreements are happening within the church body. Usually on social media. With everyone watching. (If I had a dime for every time I saw a popcorn emoji on someone’s thread, I wouldn’t have to limit my Starbucks visits on the road!) And with a HUGE election cycle coming at us in 2020, and the evangelical vote, arguably, a deciding factor on the national stage, our unity, as a whole, has never seemed more fragile (in my lifetime).

Scripture tells us that the church will be sifted, separating the wheat from the tares. Yet, even in the sifting, we are called to fight for unity. But, what in the world does it look like?

That’s what we’re trying to find out.

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